Birds....lets see your best!


I'm constantly finding myself looking for things to photograph and birds give me an easy target most of the time. Going through my libraries of images, I find that I have a ton of great shots, but no use for them. bigsmile So I figured why not start a topic and keep it going like the sunrise photoblog!


Post up your best images!




Redfish Baron Extraordinaire

www.baturinphotography.com
Replies

All pictures are welcome. We should use this section to learn new techniques and grow. I love looking at others' work if it's amateur or professional.




Redfish Baron Extraordinaire

www.baturinphotography.com







Redfish Baron Extraordinaire

www.baturinphotography.com


Capt. Larry Teuton
Cracker Built Custom Boats

"Ships are the nearest things to dreams that hands have ever made." -Robert N. Rose
Originally posted by bgf

Right there is the biggest part of taking good outdoor pictures: being in the right place at the right time! Nice job.


Being in the right place with the wrong camera might let you occasionally capture good pictures but you guys have clearly shown there is a difference between good pictures and great photography. To get the results you're getting in your photo's how much setting and focusing are you having to do with the equipment you're using?

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I am no professional; but I really enjoy my photography. It took me a long time to step out of the comfort zone of automatic settings on the camera. Most of the time, mine are not much different than those settings unless I want blurrier background.. etc That is a starting place... pay attention to the settings that come up in a program, such as 'Landscape', then change your settings slightly and see how the picture is affected. Use higher shutter speeds to capture motion, and lower to add light in dim scenarios. A lot of good reading and tips here : http://digital-photography-school.com/

Originally posted by bgf

Right there is the biggest part of taking good outdoor pictures: being in the right place at the right time! Nice job.


Being in the right place with the wrong camera might let you occasionally capture good pictures but you guys have clearly shown there is a difference between good pictures and great photography. To get the results you're getting in your photo's how much setting and focusing are you having to do with the equipment you're using?

><>

I am no professional; but I really enjoy my photography. It took me a long time to step out of the comfort zone of automatic settings on the camera. Most of the time, mine are not much different than those settings unless I want blurrier background.. etc That is a starting place... pay attention to the settings that come up in a program, such as 'Landscape', then change your settings slightly and see how the picture is affected. Use higher shutter speeds to capture motion, and lower to add light in dim scenarios. A lot of good reading and tips here : http://digital-photography-school.com/




Thanks for the web site... at first glance it looks packed with good beginner tips and it looks like it will let you go as deep as you want to go. I'm going to try experimenting with my settings like you suggested and see if I get comfortable enough to move up to better equipment one day,



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Last edited by Flat-Out
Easiest way to start is by using time value setting. TV on your DSLR. This let's you control shutter speed and the camera controls everything else.

Or use aperature priority. AP on your DSLR. You control the f stop and camera does everything else. Aperature size controls the depth of field or how blurry the background will be.

Also, be sure you use your built in light meter inside the viewfinder. This will help getting correct exposures.




Redfish Baron Extraordinaire

www.baturinphotography.com













Redfish Baron Extraordinaire

www.baturinphotography.com
Originally posted by 23Sailfish

Easiest way to start is by using time value setting. TV on your DSLR. This let's you control shutter speed and the camera controls everything else.

Or use aperature priority. AP on your DSLR. You control the f stop and camera does everything else. Aperature size controls the depth of field or how blurry the background will be.

Also, be sure you use your built in light meter inside the viewfinder. This will help getting correct exposures.




Redfish Baron Extraordinaire

www.baturinphotography.com



That's a pro tip, right there! I shoot in AV mode a lot and use TV mostly for longer, low light or night shots.... which I have in no way mastered
I don't have a DSLR camera just a small compact camera that doesn't have many manual settings. I've been able to get some good pictures with it but I think I'm about ready to move into a better camera to see if I can improve on the quality of them. Would you suggest an entry level camera to learn on or a more advanced camera that you can stay with?



















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Here's a mix of pics. Some are iphone and some are DSLR









Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught.
Last edited by jonathan