Building your own private pond


Has anyone done this or been a part of doing this?

Anyone that knows me knows I don't do things halfway. Before I get carried away, I'm looking for tips/tricks to not waste time, effort, and money. Is there anything you would or wouldn't do again?

-I have the land
-Pond size is about an acre 2-8' deep
-Planning on Bluegill, shellcracker, catfish, mosquito minnows, and eventually bass
-Structure in the pond-how much is too much?
-Will fish readily reproduce or do I need to facilitate this with structure?






"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017
Last edited by 23Sailfish
Replies

DNR still has the pond management information available online and its a great resource.

https://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/aquaff/fishpond.html

There are a couple of deeper holes dug with the excavator, but nothing crazy. DNR says that anything greater than 10' will contribute heavily to oxygen depletion. I plan on installing an aerator, so this shouldn't be a problem, but even so, I didn't want to go against what they said. I'm certainly learning here.

As for the crappie, for my size pond, they are said to take over and overpopulate quickly. They are also in direct competition with bass for food source and I don't want that.




"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017
This is where I'm getting my fish.






"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017
ive seen that flyer before and don't understand why anyone would stock mosquito fish into their pond, especially at that price. you can catch them with a dip net by the hundreds in any creek, swamp, or ditch. These fish will live in an inch of water surrounding your pond and very few will ever get eaten. The bass will forage on the bream and the bream will be eating aquatic bugs and terrestrial insects that make it into the pond.
yea ive tried crappie before and that was a bust. they never grew more then 6" and the few that did grew were super skinny.
oh stay away from anyone trying to sell "hydrids". they were awesome for 2-3 years then when they started reproducing the off spring didn't grow. had to kill off the pond and restock.
keep on top of the aquatic vegetation that grows, it can get out of hand quickly. Starting out with a few grass carp might not be a bad idea.
2 cents. replace your Island tree with a bald cypress, they will grow in water. I'm guessing yours will drown shortly? Border your pond with Cypress about every 20 yards, best thing in the world for keeping your banks from eroding and pretty too. Do not put any ducks in it, unless some small callers. They will scribble all around the edges eroding it and keep your pond muddy. Lime and fertilize it every spring.

I would hold off on Bass on a pond that size, You'll end up with only a few big ones and a bunch of stunted ones and no more Pan fish. Also expect the Channel cats to decimate you Bream and keep the water muddy. I would not do any hybrid fish, unless you stock it regular. Put in a automated feeder.

If you want catfish, I'd recommend Just catfish, feed em heavy and keep what you catch. For Catfish structure some concrete culvert Pipes work well along with some fat lighter stumps. For Bream, the way you have it sloped they will bed no problem.

Looking good. Some Screw Willows are nice, maybe a couple of Tulip poplar trees, Heck, what ever floats your boat! If it dies no big deal, put in something else.

Oh yea, with our Hot summers you can have a pond "turn" especially if it is heavily stocked or has a large algae bloom. You may need some form of aeration . Nothing worse than coming to your pond and seeing a score of dead fish floating... I've looked to several windmills that you can use to pump stagnant Bottom water and re introduce it to the pond aerated. Really good if you don't have a power source for a fountain.
2 cents. replace your Island tree with a bald cypress, they will grow in water. I'm guessing yours will drown shortly? Border your pond with Cypress about every 20 yards, best thing in the world for keeping your banks from eroding and pretty too. Do not put any ducks in it, unless some small callers. They will scribble all around the edges eroding it and keep your pond muddy. Lime and fertilize it every spring.

I would hold off on Bass on a pond that size, You'll end up with only a few big ones and a bunch of stunted ones and no more Pan fish. Also expect the Channel cats to decimate you Bream and keep the water muddy. I would not do any hybrid fish, unless you stock it regular. Put in a automated feeder.

If you want catfish, I'd recommend Just catfish, feed em heavy and keep what you catch. For Catfish structure some concrete culvert Pipes work well along with some fat lighter stumps. For Bream, the way you have it sloped they will bed no problem.

Looking good. Some Screw Willows are nice, maybe a couple of Tulip poplar trees, Heck, what ever floats your boat! If it dies no big deal, put in something else.

Oh yea, with our Hot summers you can have a pond "turn" especially if it is heavily stocked or has a large algae bloom. You may need some form of aeration . Nothing worse than coming to your pond and seeing a score of dead fish floating... I've looked to several windmills that you can use to pump stagnant Bottom water and re introduce it to the pond aerated. Really good if you don't have a power source for a fountain. Originally posted by Fred67



read this real slow and loud for those in the back.

Just don't look for spelling errors. What was said about crappy, don't put crappy in that pond. Dad and I've tried em and the only pond we have that's done OK with em is one that is really deep and is mostly shaded. Still never caught "slabs" out of it.
ive seen that flyer before and don't understand why anyone would stock mosquito fish into their pond, especially at that price. you can catch them with a dip net by the hundreds in any creek, swamp, or ditch. These fish will live in an inch of water surrounding your pond and very few will ever get eaten.
Originally posted by bioguy


From what I've read, its a good forage fish for the other species in the pond. Is this not true?




"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017
ive seen that flyer before and don't understand why anyone would stock mosquito fish into their pond, especially at that price. you can catch them with a dip net by the hundreds in any creek, swamp, or ditch. These fish will live in an inch of water surrounding your pond and very few will ever get eaten.
Originally posted by bioguy


From what I've read, its a good forage fish for the other species in the pond. Is this not true?




"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017Originally posted by 23Sailfish


I might be wrong, but I believe what Bioguy is suggesting is don't buy the minnows. Get em out of several ditches or other ponds. Super easy to catch and if you have kids it can be a fun outing! We used to make some home made nets with an old broom handle, closehanger, and window screen. not perfect but it worked. I had a edge with Dad's ponds having tons of em.

As for forage food, most everything will eat em and they multiply fast. The biggest bream I've ever caught was with a small minnow lip hooked with a #8 long shank golden hook about 28" below a cork. Wish you the best with your pond. You'll have a lot of fun with it.
Understood. I have another source for my mosquito minnows, but I'm going to the above flyer for my catfish and bream.




"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017
A milestone for sure. Looking forward to this journey and taking care of these fish for the future. There are several hundred mosquitofish in the pond already from local stocking, not to mention a bunch of happy bullfrogs and several turtles that naturally found the pond already. This past Saturday, I got 400 bluegill, 200 Shellcracker and 200 catfish. There might have been 5-6 dead bream when released, but that was it. I was pretty happy about that. From pick up to the pond's edge to acclimate was about 30 minutes.

Next step is the feeder, then an aeration system. The work is never done!










"Another poon dream splintered on the rocks of reality." --Peepod 07-25-2017